The PoPS replication reports format is a good start

Big news today is that Perspectives on Psychological Science is going to start publishing pre-registered replication reports. The inaugural editors will be Daniel Simons and Alex Holcombe, who have done the serious legwork to make this happen. See the official announcement and blog posts by Ed Yong and Melanie Tannenbaum. (Note: this isn’t the same as the earlier plan I wrote about for Psychological Science to publish replications, but it appears to be related.)

The gist of the plan is that after getting pre-approval from the editors (mainly to filter for important but as-yet unreplicated studies), proposers will create a detailed protocol. The original authors (and maybe other reviewers?) will have a chance to review the protocol. Once it has been approved, the proposer and other interested labs will run the study. Publication will be contingent on carrying out the protocol but not on the results. Collections of replications from multiple labs will be published together as final reports.

I think this is great news. In my ideal world published replications would be more routine, and wouldn’t require all the hoopla of prior review by original authors, multiple independent replications packaged together, etc. etc. In other words, they shouldn’t be extraordinary, and they should be as easy or easier to publish than original research. I also think every journal should take responsibility for replications of its own original reports (the Pottery Barn rule). BUT… this new format doesn’t preclude any of that from also happening elsewhere. By including all of those extras, PoPS replication reports might function as a first-tier, gold standard of replication. And by doing a lot of things right (such as focusing on effect sizes rather than tallying “successful” and “failed” replications, which is problematic) they might set an example for more mundane replication reports in other outlets.

This won’t solve everything — not by a long shot. We need to change scientific culture (by which I mean institutional incentives) so that replication is a more common and more valued activity. We need funding agencies to see it that way too. In a painful coincidence, news came out today that a cognitive neuroscientist admitted to misconduct in published research. One of the many things that commonplace replications would do would be to catch or prevent fraud. But whenever I’ve asked colleagues who use fMRI whether people in their fields run direct replications, they’ve just laughed at me. There’s little incentive to run them and no money to do it even if you wanted to. All of that needs to change across many areas of science.

But you can’t solve everything at once, and the PoPS initiative is an important step forward.