Does the replication debate have a diversity problem?

Folks who do not have a lot of experiences with systems that don’t work well for them find it hard to imagine that a well intentioned system can have ill effects. Not work as advertised for everyone. That is my default because that is my experience.
– Bashir, Advancing How Science is Done

A couple of months ago, a tenured white male professor* from an elite research university wrote a blog post about the importance of replicating priming effects, in which he exhorted priming researchers to “Nut up or shut up.”

Just today, a tenured white male professor* from an elite research university said that a tenured scientist who challenged the interpretation and dissemination of a failed replication is a Rosa Parks, “a powerless woman who decided to risk everything.”

Well then.

The current discussion over replicability and (more broadly) improving scientific integrity and rigor is an absolutely important one. It is, at its core, a discussion about how scientists should do science. It therefore should include everybody who does science or has a stake in science.

Yet over the last year or so I have heard a number of remarks (largely in private) from scientists who are women, racial minorities, and members of other historically disempowered groups that they feel like the protagonists in this debate consist disproportionately of white men with tenure at elite institutions. Since the debate is over prescriptions for how science is to be done, it feels a little bit like the structurally powerful people shouting at each other and telling everybody else what to do.

By itself, that is enough to make people with a history of being disempowered wonder if they will be welcome to participate. And when the debate is salted with casually sexist language, and historically illiterate borrowing of other people’s oppression to further an argument — well, that’s going to hammer the point.

This is not a call for tenured white men to step back from the conversation. Rather, it is a call to bring more people in. Those of us who are structurally powerful in various ways have a responsibility to make sure that people from all backgrounds, all career stages, and all kinds of institutions are actively included and feel safe and welcome to participate. Justice demands it. That’s enough for me, but if you need a bonus, consider that including people with personal experience seeing well-intentioned systems fail might actually produce a better outcome.

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* The tenured and professor parts I looked up. White and male I inferred from social presentation.

Let’s talk about diversity in personality psychology

In the latest issue of the ARP newsletter, Kelci Harris writes about diversity in ARP. You should read the whole thing. Here’s an excerpt:

Personality psychology should be intrinsically interesting to everyone, because, well, everyone has a personality. It’s accessible and that makes our research so fun and an easy thing to talk about with non-psychologists, that is, once we’ve explained to them what we actually do. However, despite what could be a universal appeal, our field is very homogenous. And that’s too bad, because diversity makes for better science. Good research comes from observations. You notice something about the world, and you wonder why that is. It’s probably reasonable to guess that most members of our field have experienced the world in a similar way due to their similar demographic backgrounds. This similarity in experience presents a problem for research because it makes us miss things. How can assumptions be challenged when no one realizes they are being made? What kind of questions will people from different backgrounds have that current researchers could never think of because they haven’t experienced the world in that way?

 In response, Laura Naumann posted a letter to the ARP Facebook wall. Read it too. Another excerpt:

I challenge our field to begin to view those who conduct this type of research [on underrepresented groups] as contributing work that is EQUAL TO and AS IMPORTANT AS “traditional” basic research in personality and social psychology. First, this will require editors of “broad impact” journals to take a critical eye to their initial review process in evaluating what manuscripts are worthy of being sent out to reviewers. I’ve experienced enough frustration sending a solid manuscript to a journal only to have it quickly returned praising the work, but suggesting resubmission to a specialty journal (e.g., ethnic minority journal du jour). The message I receive is that my work is not interesting enough for broad dissemination. If we want a more welcoming field on the personal level, we need to model a welcoming field at the editorial level.

This is a discussion we need to be having. Big applause to Kelci and Laura for speaking out.

Now, what should we be doing? Read what Kelci and Laura wrote — they both have good ideas.

I’ll add a much smaller one, which came up in a conversation on my Facebook wall: let’s collect data. My impressions of what ARP conferences look like are very similar to Kelci’s, but not all important forms of diversity are visible, and if we had hard data we wouldn’t have to rely on impressions. How are the members and conference attendees of ARP and other personality associations distributed by racial and ethnic groups, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, socioeconomic background, and other important dimensions? How do those break down by career stage? And if we collect data over time, is better representation moving up the career ladder, or is the pipeline leaking? I hope ARP will consider collecting this data as part of the membership and conference registration processes going forward, and releasing aggregate numbers. (Maybe they already collect this, but if so, I cannot recall ever seeing any report of it.) With data we will have a better handle on what we’re doing well and what we could be doing better.

What else should we be doing — big or small? This is a conversation that is long overdue and that everybody should be involved in. Let’s have it.